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Kentucky Wildcats Morning Quickies: Basketball Practice Edition

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News and commentary from around the Big Blue Internet. UK's open basketball practice impresses media. Neal Brown talks wide receivers. More.

Ronald Martinez

Yesterday the Kentucky Wildcats had an open practice that seems to have impressed the heck out of the media present. That’s a good thing, and there’s more below.

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  • Over at CoachCal.com, we have a practice report. It’s a good one. Consider this from Matt Jones:

    If you were to only watch this practice, you would assume that the Harrison Twins are the stars of the team. They lead the practice, direct their teammates and are clearly in control. I was impressed with both their frames, and the decision making is much improved. Aaron had some eye-opening plays, further confirming my belief that he will be the leading scorer on the team this season. Andrew penetrated well (as last year), but also finished better, something I will be focusing on when in the Bahamas. While last year they shared the spotlight with Julius Randle and James Young, in my mind, after watching this practice, this will be the Harrison Twins’ team this season.

    It should be.

  • Kyle Tucker has more on Kentucky’s practice yesterday. I know you will love this:

    On a related note, Kentucky looks like it will be an unholy terror on defense. The combination of length and a bunch of aggressive guys who appear to take great pride in it – there was lots of wild clapping and cheering among themselves after stops – will make these Cats hard to score against. On both ends, the team looks unusually cohesive, especially in the Calipari era of perpetually young teams, at this early stage. It’s easy to see they’ll be light years ahead of last year’s team when this season starts. [My emphasis]

    I love reading this. It’s exactly as I expected it to be. This team is full of guys who know what it’s like to wage a campaign, and young men who can’t wait to help them wage another.

    It’s what we’ve been hoping for, I think.

  • Linked earlier but still worth repeating. I’ve lost two dogs this decade and it is always very painful. Our prayers go out to the family. Coach Cal provides a eulogy of sorts here.

  • Jerry Tipton has some observations about the open basketball practice yesterday. Consider:

    Freshman Tyler Ulis is not tall (5-foot-9), but he could have a big impact. He’s quick physically and mentally. He thinks ahead on offense (touch-passes) and on defense (As Carly Simon once sang, anticipation). He looks ideal for Calipari’s drive-drive-drive offense.

    If you didn’t know better, you would not think Calipari is coming off hip replacement surgery. His pale legs took him all over the court. His was the lone coaching voice heard.

  • The power of UK basketball and the beauty of the Bahamas are a match made in heaven. Indeed. Just a reminder — ESPNU and the SEC Network will be televising the Big Blue Bahamas tour.

  • Kentucky gets new uniforms for the Big Blue Bahamas trip.

  • 2015 big man Doral Moore from Georgia has a UK offer.

  • Remember 2016 Malik Monk, he of the sick athleticism? He’ll be visiting campus on Wednesday.

  • Five impressions from the open practice from John Clay. Try this on for size:

    Devin Booker can shoot. The recruiting services told this and at least in Monday’s practice it looked to be true. Booker appears capable of filling the James Young role, although his game may remind you more of Doron Lamb. His ball-handling could use a bit of polish, but nearly all freshmen can improve in that area when matched against college competition.

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  • Heh. Comcast in damage control over aggressive retention policy:


  • Volcanic eruption on Io, a Jupiter moon, is spectacular, and maybe the brightest ever in our solar system.

  • Pain at the pump subsiding, for now. But events in the Middle East are liable to drive them back up again.